Legal Internet Trivia Challenge: Win a Product Key

Update: Nos. 1 and 3 have been correctly answered. No 2 is still up for grabs.

Here is your chance to answer a trivia challenge and win a prize.

In a post here last November, I wrote about Trend Micro’s SafeSync for Business, a Dropbox-like file-syncing application that promises a high level of security and 99.9% service availability. Recently, the Trend Micro people contacted me and offered three product keys to give away to readers of this blog. Each key provides free access for six months and up to three computers or users.

So, just to make it fun, I thought I’d try a legal Internet trivia challenge. For each of the following three questions, the first person who responds with the correct answer will get a key. You may respond by posting a comment below or by emailing me at ambrogi-at-gmail.com.

  1. Which law firm of more than 25 lawyers was first to launch a website and when?
  2. Which court was the first to make its opinions available in electronic format?
  3.  Which company was first to provide Web access to its legal-research research database, Westlaw or LexisNexis, and in what year did that happen?

Tom Bruce, Erik Heels and Tim Stanley are officially disqualified, because they’ll know this stuff off the top of their heads!

Let me state that I have no pecuniary interest in this of any kind. I am receiving no money or other compensation from Trend Micro for doing this. They were kind enough to offer the keys and I am merely conveying their offer.

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11 Responses to “Legal Internet Trivia Challenge: Win a Product Key”

  1. 1. Heller Ehrman, 1994?

  2. John Soto says:

    Which law firm of more than 25 lawyers was first to launch a website and when?
    1994: Heller Ehrman launched first law firm website.

    Which court was the first to make its opinions available in electronic format?
    The official version of the court’s decisions handed down prior to February 14, 2009 may be found in the bound volumes of the Arkansas Reports. As of that date, the Arkansas Supreme Court became the first state court to designate the electronic version—as opposed to a physical, published version—as the official version of its opinions.

    Which company was first to provide Web access to its legal-research research database, Westlaw or LexisNexis, and in what year did that happen?
    Around 1989, both companies started offering programs for personal computers that emulated their terminals, and when Internet access became available, an Internet address (such as westlaw.westlaw.com) became an alternative that could be selected within the “Communications Setup” option in the client program, instead of a dial-up number. West’s program was known as Westmate. It was based on Borland C++ around 1997, and then changed to a program compiled on a Microsoft platform that incorporated portions of Internet Explorer. This was the first program to incorporate HTML; prior to that, Westmate had “jumps” indicated by triangles instead of “links.”

    • Everybody says Heller Ehrman and the firm’s own literature claimed it was first, but my research indicates that’s wrong. There was another large firm ahead of them.

  3. 1. I would guess Venable LLP in March of 1994? Venable is their newest name. Back in the day they were known as Venable, Baetjer & Howard.

  4. […] by Robert Ambrogi in GeneralWhich law firm was first to have a website? I asked this in my recent Legal Internet Trivia Challenge. Congratulations to Edward Granger of Marketing on Trial for providing the correct answer.So which […]

  5. […] via the Internet No comments · Posted by Robert Ambrogi in GeneralAnother question in my Legal Internet Trivia Challenge was, “Which court was the first to make its opinions available in electronic format?” […]

  6. Wow, talk about a walk down memory lane. That would be my work establishing that 1st website. Stevie Barrett brought this to my attention. Painful lessons back then, it is true what they say, “pioneers can be easily seen, they are the ones with the arrows in their backs.” Those were the days where branding (i.e. messing with the letterhead with every partner’s name on it and the Web were verboten. Hired the legendary Berkey Belser to help us get there. Been out of the industry since ’97 and never looked back. There is no way for any marketer worth their salt to keep 300 lawyers happy. If they’re happy, you ain’t doin’ it right.

  7. And Edward, the firm back then was Venable Baetjer and Howard in Baltimore and Venable Baetjer Howard and Civiletti in DC… don’t ask.

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