New Law.com Site Launched Today

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Law.com rolled out its revamped website today, with reorganized navigational elements and the all-new Contributor Network of more than 160 outside writers.

News from across the ALM network of print and web publications is now accessible through a single subscription. Stories are organized not by publications but by practice areas, with five main practice areas to start: Appellate, Corporate and Securities, Intellectual Property, Labor & Employment, and Class Actions and Product Liability. Additional practice areas will be added later this year, ALM says.

Stories are also organized within a “Legal Industry” category that includes industry-wide news as well as stories specific to law firms, corporate counsel and law firms.

A new Contributors section features posts contributed by unpaid outside writers, including lawyers, judges, corporate counsel and others from various sectors of the legal industry. The contributor network uses the same publishing platform that Forbes uses for its network.

Law.com is offering a 30-day trial subscription to the new site. After the free trial, there are three options for paid subscriptions:

  • Law.com Elite, at $99 a month, which provides access to all practice areas and publications.
  • Law.com Plus, at $79.99 a month, which includes any three practice areas or publications.
  • Law.com Basic, at $49.99 a month, which includes any two practice areas or publications.

Non-subscribers will be limited to viewing five articles a month.

For previous coverage of the changes to Law.com, see:

 

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2 Responses to “New Law.com Site Launched Today”

  1. Avon says:

    If one’s interest is in general litigation, law practice management, and the Judiciary and court system, is that so weird?

    To me, it’s just general practice. Yet none of those topics are “practice areas,” so one must subscribe to the highest level of Law.com membership in order to have a shot at searching out news about any of them (let alone all of them).

    I don’t see why most Law.com content must fall within none of their new “practice areas” or publications. Perhaps they should have asked for feedback on that from a lawyer or two.

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