New Software Promises to Simplify Contract Drafting, But Only on Macs

Two brothers — one a lawyer, the other a software engineer — have teamed up to create a software application they say will make the process of creating and analyzing contracts more accurate and efficient. But before all you Windows users get too excited, the software works only on Apple Macintosh computers.

The software, Turner, was released yesterday by the two brothers’ company, Paper Software. According to the announcement, Turner’s core feature is called Proofreader. It automatically checks a contract for common drafting problems. It looks for words and phrases that look like defined terms but are not, broken cross-references, and more. Proofreader works in the background so that users can keep working without interruption.

Another feature, Navigators, allow users to find high-level information in a contract quickly and easily, the announcement said. The Provisions Navigator lets the user explore a contract using an outline view. The Defined Terms Navigator lets the user find important words and phrases with one click. The Related Items Navigator helps find interconnections. Other Navigators help you manage comments and create attachments. As the user make changes to the contract, Turner keeps the Navigators and the contract in sync.

The announcement said that Turner also provides new tools that make finding detailed information in a contract quick and simple. In addition to conventional text searches, users can use tokens to easily find amounts of money, dates and times, defined terms, and more.

It also includes editing tools that can be used to add provisions, numbered lists, defined terms, and other items with one click. Start typing a use of a defined term and then complete it by choosing from a simple menu. To create a cross-reference, click the item you want to reference.

Turner offers a 30-day free trial. After that, the cost is $125 monthly or $995 yearly.

The lawyer half of the team that created Turner, Benjamin Whetsell, is a former associate at Fried Frank in New York City and a graduate of Columbia Law School. His brother Nathan Whetsell formerly developed software at Bose Corporation for acoustical prediction and visualization.