Two legal technology companies said this week that they are offering free access to their products to attorneys involved in civil rights matters.

Legal research company Casetext is offering free access to its Compose brief automation for Title VII motions through the remainder of the summer.

The company was inspired to do this, it says in a blog post, in celebration of the historic ruling in Bostock v. Clayton County, in which the Supreme Court held that an employer violates Title VII when it fires an employee for being gay or transgender.

As I wrote when it launched earlier this year, Compose is a first-of-its-kind product that helps lawyers create the first draft of a litigation brief in a fraction of the time it would normally take.

Attorneys who would like to use Compose to assist in drafting Title VII briefs can sign up for free access at https://compose.law/title-vii/.

Free Credit Card Processing

Meanwhile, the electronic-payments company Gravity Legal says that it will offer $50,000 of free credit card processing to firms that focus primarily on civil rights.

“The data shows that protecting civil rights comes with unique financial challenges,” the company said in announcing the offer. “We can’t fix that, but we can lighten the load.”

To apply for the offer, a firm must be nominated using this submission form.

The blog post provided no details on the criteria the company will apply in screening submissions, other than that the firm must focus primarily on civil rights law.

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Photo of Bob Ambrogi Bob Ambrogi

Bob is a lawyer, veteran legal journalist, and award-winning blogger and podcaster. In 2011, he was named to the inaugural Fastcase 50, honoring “the law’s smartest, most courageous innovators, techies, visionaries and leaders.” Earlier in his career, he was editor-in-chief of several legal…

Bob is a lawyer, veteran legal journalist, and award-winning blogger and podcaster. In 2011, he was named to the inaugural Fastcase 50, honoring “the law’s smartest, most courageous innovators, techies, visionaries and leaders.” Earlier in his career, he was editor-in-chief of several legal publications, including The National Law Journal, and editorial director of ALM’s Litigation Services Division. At LexBlog, he oversees LexBlog.com, the global legal news and commentary network.