Above are the slides from my July 20 presentation on crowdsourcing to the American Association of Law Libraries annual meeting. When I first suggested the title, I was sure the presentation would be a positive one, demonstrating the ways in which crowdsourcing and collaboration “are changing” legal research. I have long been a believer that

CanLIIConnectsCap

Crowdsourcing the law is a concept any number of legal sites have tried over the years, as I’ve written about many times. The idea behind it makes perfect sense. There are lots of very smart legal professionals out there in the world — practitioners, academics, librarians and even law students. If they can be encouraged

CasetextEnvironmental
Environmental Law is one of Casetext’s new communities.

It was one year ago that I first wrote here about Casetext, the free legal research site that uses “crowdsourcing” to annotate court opinions. More recently, I wrote about Casetext’s addition of a citator, called WeCite. Now, there is more Casetext news to report.

Casetext is preparing to launch a new version of its research platform that will add communities and other social features. The new features have already been rolled out in a beta version. The text version came out of private beta last week and is now in public beta at beta.casetext.com.
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