Articles Tagged with Ravel Law

LexisNexis is today announcing the launch of Lexis Answers, a feature that brings artificial intelligence to the Lexis Advance legal research platform. With Lexis Answers, a researcher can ask a natural-language question and get back the single-best answer in the form of what Lexis is calling a Lexis Answer Card. LexisNexis says that Lexis Answers […]

As I reported yesterday, LexisNexis has acquired legal-research start-up Ravel Law. One of Ravel’s most significant projects over the past two years has been its collaboration with Harvard Law School to digitize Harvard’s entire collection of U.S. case law, said to be the most comprehensive and authoritative database of American cases anywhere outside the Library […]

In major legal-industry news, LexisNexis Legal & Professional today announced its acquisition of Ravel Law, the legal research, analytics and visualization platform that empowers users to contextualize and interpret large amounts of legal information to uncover valuable insights. Rumors of the impending acquisition have been circulating for weeks. This morning, I spoke with Jeff Pfeifer, VP of product […]

The legal research service Ravel Law today announced the launch of a new feature, Firm Analytics, that provides insights on law firms’ litigation histories that can be used for competitive intelligence and research into firms’ litigation activity. I am traveling today and have not seen this new feature. Ravel CEO Daniel Lewis says it can be […]

The legal research service Ravel Law, which last year launched Judge Analytics to provide analysis of how individual federal court judges make decisions, today is launching Court Analytics, a similar feature that applies analytics to an entire court, including all its cases and judges. (For more on Ravel Law’s Judge Analytics, see my posts here […]

A Massachusetts case from 1884. An update today on the joint project of Harvard Law School and Ravel Law to digitize Harvard’s entire collection of U.S. case law, which they say is the most comprehensive and authoritative database of American cases anywhere outside the Library of Congress. Today Ravel posted the complete digitized court opinions […]

Judge analytics is the new black. Or at least that’s what I wrote in a post last summer that discussed several products that could do things such as help you predict how a particular judge might rule on an issue or which cases that judge was likely to find most persuasive. One of the products I covered […]

What have been 2015’s most important developments in legal technology? For the past two years, I’ve posted my picks of the top developments in legal tech (2014, 2013). With another year under our belts, it’s time to look back at 2015. What follows are my picks for the year’s most important legal technology developments. As […]