Articles Tagged with caselaw

It now seems almost ludicrous. But until fairly recently, legal publishing giant West claimed that it owned the copyright to federal court decisions. I’m not talking about the headnotes West writes or the key numbering it adds, I’m talking about basic information such as the name of the case, the date of the case, the […]

Back in January, I had the first pre-launch review of WestlawNext, West’s next-generation version of its legal-research service. Via a tweet today from Ron Coleman, I learned of an April 23 review posted at AALL Spectrum by Ryan Harrington, reference librarian at Yale Law School. Harrington’s bottom line: “I found the product to be a […]

[The following column originally appeared in print in January 2010. I am republishing it as part of my continuing effort to maintain an archive of my published columns. Important note: I have not updated this since its original publication. While most of the sites remain as described, some may have changed. All information was current […]

Law.com now has my extended review of Bloomberg Law, the new legal research service that aims to muscle in on the turf now occupied by Westlaw and LexisNexis. (Also see my post earlier this week about the Bloomberg Law biometric doohickey.) (Note: The Law.com version is now behind a paywall. You can find another version […]

Lawyers spend much of their time at their computers, and much of that time using Microsoft Word or Microsoft Outlook. In recognition of that, LexisNexis today is announcing a major new product that integrates search and other tools directly within Word and Outlook. Called Lexis® for Microsoft Office, the product is an add-on to Office […]

Rumors have been circulating for some time now about Project Cobalt, Westlaw’s internal code name for its most significant overhaul since it moved to the Web. Now we know that Project Cobalt’s official name is WestlawNext and that West will formally introduce it to the public on Feb. 1 at LegalTech New York. Recently, West […]

The legal research service Fastcase is preparing to launch an application that will let users research cases and statutes on their iPhones, all for free. The app is awaiting final approval from Apple before it will be available in the App Store. Fastcase granted me an exclusive first look at a pre-release version of the […]

In a post earlier today at Legal Blog Watch, The Google Gorilla Enters the Research Game, I wrote about Google’s announcement yesterday that Google Scholar now allows users to search full-text legal opinions from U.S. federal and state appellate and trial courts. I wrote there about the implications of the announcement, but wanted to post […]